TTCS Tactical Terminal Control System: 8 Cool Facts

If you have ever examined the amount of air traffic in the sky over the United States and surrounding areas in any given day, you probably would be amazed that there are not more accidents.

It looks like the Baldiority here in San Juan, Puerto Rico at 8 AM or 4 PM, but there are far more accidents on the Baldiority then there are in the skies above us.

Why?

Because of the Air Traffic Control systems and the experts that operate them.

But what about the military? When deployed to various locations, they cannot just build a tower and install all the equipment needed to direct Air Force jets, Army helicopters and other crafts that fly to aide in the mission of destroying the enemy and keeping freedom strong.

That is where TTCS Tactical Terminal Control System comes in. Today, I am going to give you 8 cool facts about this system.

tactical terminal control system

#1: Mobile

The TTCS Tactical Terminal Control System from the United States Army is a self-contained air traffic control system that can be rapidly deployed and can be moved at the drop of a hat.

It is mobile in that, all equipment is installed in a M998 HMMWV so it can be driven nearly anywhere.

#2: Not Just For The Army

While TTCS Tactical Terminal Control System is an Army system, it is capable of providing ground to to air communications for any United States Services aircraft be it Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines or even Coast Guard. It also can communicate with allied aircraft.

#3: Works In Conjunction With Other Systems

While TTCS is the communications system, there must be other systems too. They include:

  • Digital Airport Surveillance Radar (DASR)
  • Tactical Non-Directional Beacon (NDB)
  • AN/TPN-31 Air Traffic Navigation
  • DoD Advanced Automation System (DAAS)
  • Coordination System (ATNAVICS)
  • AN/TSW-7A Tactical Tower
  • Fixed Based Precision Approach Radar
  • AN/MSQ-135 Mobile Tower System (MOTS)
  • AN/TSQ-221B Tactical Airspace Integration System (TAIS)
  • and more

#4: The MOS

Soldiers are specially trained to manage the TTCS system. At one time the MOS was 15Q but from what I see, it is now a 93C.

If I have that wrong, please correct me in the comment area at the end.

Other posts you may enjoy:

  1. Army 150A Warrant Officer: Air Traffic Control Technician
  2. Army 15Q MOS: Air Traffic Controller
  3. and, Army Air Defense Artillery History: 10 Cool Facts
  4. Army 150U Tactical Unmanned Aerial Systems (TUAS) Operations Technician: Duties, Responsibilities and Things You Should Know
  5. The Top 15 U.S. Army Helicopters Of All Time

#5: For Extreme Cases In Civil Aviation

If a breakdown occurs in any civil aviation systems, the Army has agreed to provide air traffic control for civilian flights using the TTCS system until any issues can be fixed.

#6: Simulator

Training on the TTCS system can be difficult. In most cases, an experienced controller must work with a trainee and allowing that trainee to “take the reigns” can be frightening to say the least.

In 2012, it was determined that instead of “live” training, a simulator should be developed. The first simulator was fielded at Redstone Arsenal in 2014.

#7: How TTCS Is Powered

The main power source for TTCS is a diesel generator but it can also convert to a portable battery powered man pack system.

#8: Always Looking To Better The System

While not absolutely perfect, TTCS is a huge step forward but there are developments always in the works to make it better. One is the newest mobile tower known as MOTS and systems are being developed to make communications strong with no chance of interference.

Final Thoughts

From all my research, it seems like TTCS is a great system, but I would love to hear from those who have or do use the system.

What could be better? Please tell us more.

Thank you for visiting and please share this with others.

References

  1. https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/systems/ttcs.htm
  2. https://fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ac/equip/ttcs.htm
  3. http://www.armyaviationmagazine.com/index.php/archive/not-so-current/894-pm-air-traffic-control
  4. 93C MOS – Air Traffic Control – Soldier’s Manual (Downloadable PDF)
  5. http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a251222.pdf
  6. http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a228798.pdf
  7. http://www.adacel.com/press/2014/ArmyAviation_April_May_2014.pdf

About The Author

Greg Boudonck is a full time freelance writer and the author of over 50 books. He served in the United States Army in the early 1980’s and enjoys writing about military subjects. You can see Greg’s books on Amazon by searching his name and you can also visit his website at Lancerlife.com.

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