TAIS Tactical Airspace Integration System: Top 10 Cool Facts

Tactical Airspace Integration System

When you consider all factors, war that has various players; joint warfare and the multiple services… Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force, we must have systems in place that ensure that men and machinery are safe.

When we consider all the different air vehicles and weapons, unless there is some control and knowledge who and what is where, the odds of friendly fire and deaths are high.

TAIS Tactical Airspace Integration System is designed to solve that problem.

In today’s post, I am going to give you the top 10 cool facts about TAIS.

#1: What It Is

TAIS Tactical Airspace Integration System is an automated battlefield system that fills the requirements of Army Airspace Command as well as Air Traffic Service via the Airspace Information Center. It digitizes the airspace management in both fields.

#2: Operates With All

TAIS is aware of all friendly and enemy air activity and will inter-operate with all joint, coalition and civil aviation services.

#3: Why TAIS Was Developed

The predecessor to TAIS was the AN/TSC-61B Flight Coordination Central (FCC) system. While it was good, it only operated with Army air traffic. So if a helicopter from Great Britain was in the airspace, pilots had to rely on their sight instead of a managed system on the ground.

During Desert Storm, this was a noticeable issue.

Pilots are good, but when receiving fire and other stressful situations, it helps to have a system telling you where other aircraft are.

TAIS fills that requirement.

#4: Tests And More Tests

With the knowledge that “knowledge overload” can sometimes be worse than too little in battlefield situations, experienced pilots were tested using various TAIS data given to them while flying a mission in a simulator in congested circumstances.

This was all done at Redstone Arsenal and the Army Laboratories found the best combination of information that pilots need in these situations. But the system can be manipulated in any given battlefield situation to give the operators more or less information.

#5: For Commanders

TAIS also provides battlefield commanders with more information than ever was possible. Using TAIS, they can see where artillery fire is coming from. They are more capable of directing artillery fire. It allows commanders to move ground units in a way that air units can protect and serve them better while staying in the safest zones.

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  2. Army 150A Warrant Officer: Air Traffic Control Technician
  3. Army 150U Tactical Unmanned Aerial Systems (TUAS) Operations Technician: Duties, Responsibilities and Things You Should Know
  4. Army 15Q MOS: Air Traffic Controller
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The Objectives

#6: Synchronization and Integration

Think of it like a cheat code for a video game. It synchronizes and integrates all friendly activity so that all is working toward a common goal.

#7: Deconfliction

When the Tactical Commander gives certain airspace priority for battle operations, TAIS will deconflict that space.

#8: Fully Automated

Simply giving TAIS orders to perform certain functions when certain conditions arise means it will carry those functions out. Example: if artillery is fired from enemy from points A, B or D, TAIS will message ground troops at points C, F and M to move on the flanks of said artillery and destroy.

#9: Workload Reduction

As stated in #8, the automation will naturally reduce workloads.

#10: Joint Enhancement

TAIS will enhance interoperability with joint, multinational, and civil command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence systems.

Final Thoughts

Technology is a great thing. TAIS can and will cut down on the amount of injuries and deaths from friendly actions. And the fact that it is automated will allow personnel to work on other needed tasks.

What are your thoughts?

Have you worked with TAIS yet? If you have, please give us your opinion.

Thank you and have a great day!

References

  1. https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/policy/army/fm/3-52/appc.htm
  2. https://gdmissionsystems.com/en/command-and-control/tactical-airspace-integration-system-tais
  3. https://www.army.mil/article/200583/peo_aviation_showcases_tactical_airspace_command_and_control_capability
  4. http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a584170.pdf
  5. https://fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ac/equip/tais.htm

About The Author

Greg Boudonck is a full time freelance writer and the author of over 50 books. He served in the United States Army in the early 1980’s and enjoys writing about military subjects. You can see Greg’s books on Amazon by searching his name and you can also visit his website at Lancerlife.com.

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