Readiness Management Period (RMP Funds): What You Should Know

RMP is an often misunderstood subject in the Army National Guard and the Army Reserve. In today’s post, we are going to delve into RMP Funds: what they are and how they work.

RMP stands for Readiness Management Period. The essential purpose of RMP is to make sure that each and every service member is prepared in case a deployment of any type were to take place. Readiness Management Period often falls into categories of:

  • Additional training beyond drills

  • Administrative functions

  • Maintenance functions

  • Etc….

Because so many of these cases fall outside of drill periods, a system was developed to make sure Soldiers are compensated for time away from their regular employment outside of the Guard or Reserve.

Funds are set aside just for Readiness Management Period payments. The Department of Defense has stringent regulations on what can be covered in RMPs. Regularly scheduled IDT training that is missed by a Soldier cannot be scheduled as an RMP. This would fall into a SUTA situation.

Readiness Management periods are often used to guarantee that the unit is prepared for scheduled drills. They are normally utilized when full time staff is not available. They are not to be used to lighten the workload of a military technician. If the duty is within the job description and responsibility of a military technician, an RMP will not be granted.

Readiness Management Periods cannot be during a period of IDT (Inactive Duty Training). IDT periods are to last a minimum of 4 hour increments.

Readiness Management Periods must last a minimum of 3 hours. Only 1 RMP can be performed in any given day and can never be scheduled on a day when any type of other training is taking place. Each unit receives a certain amount of RMPs depending on the funding available. Besides the RMPs I listed earlier in this article, some other common ones are:

  • Dental exams

  • Periodic health assignments (PHA)

The Department of Defense has established some strict guidelines on RMPs. They have a hierarchy drawn up on the DOD Instructions 1215.06. In this hierarchy, RMPs are considered additional IDT.

The DOD states that in any Fiscal Year, 36 RMPs are allowed per service member. Priority for Readiness Management Periods are given to members who are not dual status military technicians. Also, military technicians cannot be given leave so they can perform RMP tasks.

Retirement points

Readiness Management Periods are equal to 1 IDT (Inactive Duty Training), and also are worth 1 retirement point.

RMPs must have approval before they can be performed; there are no exceptions.

Final Thoughts

Some commanders have authorized RMPs without having the proper funds to do so. This is very unfair to the Soldier. RMPs are sometimes depleted in favor of more important missions, so it is wise as a commander to make sure the unit member will be paid for the RMP before they authorize it.

I really hope that after reading this article you understand Readiness Management Periods in a better fashion. RMPs can be confusing in multiple ways. If you have any questions on RMPs, feel free to ask, and we will attempt to get the correct answer for you.

What are your experiences with Readiness Management Periods? Please give your thoughts and opinions below. Thank you.

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