General Micah Jenkins: Top 10 Cool Facts

general micah jenkins
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It is a subject that raises aggressive attitudes… The Civil War.

And dare you not show any respect to the Confederates unless you want to be deemed prejudice.

I would like to counter that thought pattern. While we may not agree with the reason some military forces are fighting, we do need to give them the respect due them in their leadership abilities and their determination. After all, they believed in something they felt was right.

I must admit that it does frustrate me that people and organizations are putting up such a battle to remove statues and historical markers of Confederate’s. Sure, the idea they were fighting to keep slavery was wrong. And no, I do not believe in slavery, but it is history. It is something we need to learn from and the men who fought on the side of the South were doing so because they believed they were right.

And believe me, we all have believed in something at one time or another we thought was right, only to have that turned around and be discovered an error in judgment.

But enough of my rambling… Today, I am going to give you 10 cool facts about General Micah Jenkins; a Confederate leader.

But instead of looking at him as an evil person fighting for an evil thing, try looking at him as a man like any of us. And believe me, if you were raised in the South during those days, you would have probably been fighting for the same cause.

#1: Birth

Micah Jenkins was born in 1835 on Edisto Island, South Carolina. Edisto Island is part of the Charleston metropolitan area. The island is now considered a huge tourist location.

#2: Attended Military Academy

Micah had a military mind and attended the South Carolina Military Academy where he graduated first in his class. The South Carolina Military Academy is now known as The Citadel and is one of the top Senior Military Colleges in the United States.

#3: Founded A Military School

After graduating from the South Carolina Military Academy, Micah and his friend, Asbury Coward founded the Kings Mountain Military School in Yorkville, South Carolina. That was in 1855. He ran it until 1861.

#4: Micah The Recruiter

At the start of the Civil War, Micah recruited many from his years teaching and formed the 5th South Carolina Infantry Regiment and Micah was their Colonel.

Colonel Jenkins and the 5th fought under General David Jones at the First Battle of Bull Run and soon after, Jenkins and his troops were put under General Richard Anderson.

#5: Brigade Command

During the Battle of Seven Pines, General Anderson was temporarily given division command so Colonel Jenkins was given command of the Brigade. This included:

  • The 5th
  • 6th
  • and the Palmetto Sharpshooters

Colonel Jenkins showed magnificent leadership abilities even after being wounded in the knee.

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#6: A Young General

At 26 years old, in 1862, Jenkins was promoted to Brigadier General.

#7: Battles

Jenkins served with much distinction. These are the battles he and his troops participated in…

  • First Battle of Bull Run
  • Battle of Seven Pines
  • Second Battle of Bull Run (Jenkins was wounded in the shoulder and chest)
  • Battle of Chickamauga
  • and the Battle of the Wilderness

#8: Friendly Fire

It was at the Battle of the Wilderness… In a similar way that General “Stonewall” Jackson was killed…

Brigadier General Jenkins and Lieutenant General James Longstreet were riding together and Confederate soldiers mistook them for the enemy. Jenkins was shot in the head and died a few hours later. Longstreet survived his wounds.

#9: Micah Jr.

Jenkins and his wife had 5 children. One of those children was also named Micah and followed in his Father’s military footsteps. Micah Jr.

  • Graduated from West Point in 1879
  • Served with Teddy Roosevelt’s “Rough Riders” in the Spanish – American War
  • He passed away in 1912.

#10: Burial And Memory

One thing that should be noted is Jenkins always had his Bible. When he had free time, he read it.

Jenkins lies with his wife in front of a statue erected in his honor at the Citadel. But has it been taken down? I hope not.

The Citadel also has Jenkins Hall named after him.

Upon Jenkin’s death, General Longstreet wrote this:

‘He was one of the most estimable characters of the army. His taste and talent were for military service. He was intelligent, quick, untiring, attentive, zealous in discharge of duty, truly faithful to official obligations, abreast with the foremost in battle, and withal a humble, noble Christian. In a moment of highest earthly hope, he was transported to serenest heavenly joy; to that life beyond that knows no bugle call, beat of drum or clash of steel. May his beautiful spirit, through the mercy of God, rest in peace! Amen!’

Final Thoughts

What more can I add?

How can we not respect a man such as Micah Jenkins?

Post your comments below.

Thank you.

References

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micah_Jenkins
  2. http://civilwarintheeast.com/people/micah-jenkins/
  3. http://home.freeuk.com/gazkhan/micah.htm
  4. https://www.revolvy.com/page/Micah-Jenkins?
  5. https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Micah_Jenkins
  6. https://civilwartalk.com/threads/letter-by-gen-micah-jenkins.141194/
  7. https://emergingcivilwar.com/2014/05/06/death-of-jenkins/

About The Author

Greg Boudonck is a full time freelance writer and the author of over 50 books. He served in the United States Army in the early 1980’s and enjoys writing about military subjects. You can see Greg’s books on Amazon by searching his name and you can also visit his website at Lancerlife.com.

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