Army Leave Overview

army leave formThere are various reasons Army personnel may want to take leave…

  • A vacation
  • To move family residence
  • Or possibly an emergency such as sickness or death in the family

And while many believe leave is a “right,” I must tell you that is not entirely true.

If you are deployed overseas, the odds of getting leave are highly unlikely unless there is a death or terrible sickness in the family.

Yes, you do accrue leave days as you serve, but that does not mean the Army has to give you those leave days. But, if all the i’s are dotted and the T’s are crossed, your odds of getting requested leave are much better.

In today’s post, I am going to explain the proper procedure for attaining Army Leave. I will also provide you with links to the proper forms you will need.

Proper Procedure For Asking For Army Leave

As with all things Army, to get leave, you should follow the chain of command.

  • Approach your team leader and request leave. He/she should ask if you have available days, why, where and what you are going to do. If he/she sees no issue, he/she will take you to the squad leader, Platoon Sergeant, or both where you repeat the same process.
  • If they agree, you will be told to fill out DA Form 31 and they will fill you in on Risk Assessment. That Risk Assessment along with the copy of DA Form 31 must be carried with you at all times while on leave.
  • Once you fill out DA Form 31 (completely), your Platoon Sergeant will probably sign off on it and deliver it to the Commander.
  • When and if your Commander signs off, leave is granted. The form will be sent to S1 and you can sign out on leave the day it begins.

Other posts you may enjoy:

  1. 31 Places To Visit In Europe On Military Leave
  2. The Best Time to Leave the Army
  3. Army DJMS Overview
  4. Veteran Financial Help: Resources & Good to Know Information
  5. TC-AIMS II: Transportation Coordinators’ – Automated Information for Movement Systems II

Your Responsibilities

  • If there is a change in authorized leave or do not begin leave on schedule you must notify the chain of command immediately.
  • You will begin and end leave on post, at the duty station, or from the place you regularly commute to work. When reporting back in off leave, you must be signed back in to the unit no later than 2400 on the last day of leave. Remember it is your responsibility to ensure that you are at your place of departure at the appointed time. Failure to do so may result in punitive or administrative action against you except for circumstances due to no fault of your own.
  • You are responsible for all your travel expenses. You must ensure that you have adequate funds to cover any additional expenses you may incur in the event your scheduled return is either delayed or canceled.
  • Extensions in the excess of 7 days can only be approved by the Battalion Commander.

Where You Can Get A DA Form 31

You can download a DA Form 31 at this link.

Final Thoughts

While it never hurts to ask for Army Leave, keep in mind that it is not always in the best interest of your leaders to grant it.

If you are the only person in your MOS with important responsibilities, they may not be able to cover your job for the time you are gone.

But follow protocol and most leaders will do their best to see you do get your leave.

If you have any questions, ask!

If any of you would like to share any other tips on Army Leave, please do.

Thank you.

References

  1. https://armypubs.army.mil/ProductMaps/PubForm/DAForm.aspx
  2. http://www.armyproperty.com/Resources/Forms/HTML/DA-31.htm
  3. https://formswift.com/da-31
  4. https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-process-for-a-Leave-Request-from-the-US-Army
  5. https://personnel.wv.gov/agencies/Pages/militaryleave.aspx
  6. https://hooa.com/leave_pass-da-form-31-download/
  7. https://www.armystudyguide.com/content/army_counseling/event_oriented_counseling/leave-procedures.shtml

About The Author

Greg Boudonck is a full time freelance writer and the author of over 50 books. He served in the United States Army in the early 1980’s and enjoys writing about military subjects. You can see Greg’s books on Amazon by searching his name and you can also visit his website at Lancerlife.com.

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