Army 640A Warrant Officer: Veterinary Services Food Safety Officer

In this post, you will learn about the Army 640A Warrant Officer, the Veterinary Services Food Safety Officer. The title of this job suggests that this position will be primarily working with animals. The fact is, this job goes much further in depth than just that.

Within this post, I will explain the duties, responsibilities, job description, career opportunities, and the prerequisites of the 640A Veterinary Services Food Safety Officer, but first I would like to provide how this position came about.

Background

In the early 1900’s, the Veterinary Corps in the military was of prime importance in the safety of food that would be consumed by members of the United States military. This made good sense since the main food source was butchered animals. Veterinarians were the best qualified to guarantee the meat from these animals was safe to consume. In 1981 MOS-051A, Food Inspection Technician was created. In the mid 1980’s, that specialty was changed to MOS-640A, Veterinary Services Technician. The U.S. Army Veterinary Services has become the Department of Defense experts on food safety.

Duties, Responsibilities and Job Description

  • Conduct audits of commercial sanitation. This means inspecting food distributors who supply the Army, and ensure they follow Current Good Manufacturing Practices.

  • Manages safety in food areas including equipment, storage and handling.

  • Manages food quality assurance programs.

  • The commander’s expert with all food safety issues.

Career Opportunities

With on-going training on a consistent basis, the 640A Warrant Officer, Veterinary Services Food Safety Officer is in a win-win situation for life after Army service. This position has many educational seminars and programs put on by the USDA and the FDA which will keep you abreast on changing rules and safety issues in food supplies.

There is great odds a person with this MOS could be hired by either the USDA or FDA, or possibly OSHA. There are ample food supply companies that always need experts in food supplies.  With all of that, this MOS is still trained in veterinarian services. There are always needs for those who can aid with the pets of civilians.

Finding a career after the Army after holding the 640A MOS will be no problem.

If you decide to stay in the Army, you could serve as a staff officer, instructor, advisor, OIC, or a variety of other positions.  There are plenty of opportunities to work your way up through the ranks, all the way to CW5.

Prerequisites to Serve as a 640A Warrant Officer

At this time, only NCO’s SGT and higher with a 68R or 68S MOS are eligible to apply for this Warrant Officer career field. If you are qualified in either of those MOS’s, these are the minimum prerequisites:

  • A minimum of an Associate’s Degree from an accredited college with completion of a college level writing course

  • GT score of 110+

  • Minimum of 66 months active military service and maximum of 144 months

  • Must meet all physical requirements and pass the standard APFT

  • If selected for this position, candidates are sent to WOCS at Fort Rucker, Alabama

Final Thoughts

Another great benefit of this position is that yearly, two or three 640A Warrant Officers are chosen to attend a major University to complete a bachelor or master degree program in food safety and science. The Army pays all tuition and book costs along with the officer’s normal salary.

All in all, the 640A Warrant Officer position is a wise career move. What are your thoughts? Have you, or anyone you know served in this position? If so, please explain what you liked or disliked about the Army 640A Warrant Officer, Veterinary Services Food Safety Officer. Do you have any tips for someone considering applying?  I look forward to hearing from you. 

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5 thoughts on “Army 640A Warrant Officer: Veterinary Services Food Safety Officer”

  1. Hi,
    I have a question about getting into 640A in national guard. I am active duty army E-4 but different MOS, not 68R/68S MOS. I pursued Masters in food science prior to joining the army and couple of years of private food industry experience. I had to join just to get a single benefit. Anyway now I am getting out of active service but thinking to do guard only if given 640A.
    Is it possible?

    1. Steve, I believe you would have a great chance of becoming a 640A in the Guard. It is best that you consult with an Army Career Counselor. Let us know how it works out.

  2. That is cool Adrienne. I am happy to hear you enjoy that position, and that counts a lot. When you enjoy a job, you are bound to do it better, and as you say, soldiers need to eat, and with Warrant Officers like you, we know the food they are eating is safe. Thanks.

  3. I am a 640A, CW2 now, and it was the best decision I've ever made. This job is great for several reasons.

    ONE: I am the expert in my field. It feels good, although scary at times, that several offices call on me for help and advice in the matter of food safety. Not only do the Soldiers and Officers in my unit rely on my expertise, but I also deal with AAFES, MWR, DeCA, DLA, food service personnel, as well as commercial establishments, and foreign agencies to include customs at border control points all over Northern Europe. It's exciting.

    TWO: I still get to train and mentor Soldiers in food safety and in professional development. That was my biggest reservation on becoming a Warrant Officer because I loved being with the Soldiers. But now I can influence them and have a bigger impact on them in a broader sense.

    THREE: I get to travel. I've seen every type of food establishment from the mom and pop ice cream producer in Germany, to poultry and rabbit slaughterhouses in France, to mushroom plants in the Netherlands, to different type of dairy plants in Denmark, and water plants in Poland.

    It is a very important job because Soldiers can't fight if they can't eat and I have a hand in ensuring the food troops and their families consume is safe. There's no better feeling for me than knowing my efforts directly impact the success of trainings and missions.

    1. That’s awesome, Adrienne. I’m glad we have dedicated, passionate people like yourself serving in the military and making a difference. Keep up the good work!

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