Army 11C MOS: The Indirect Fire Infantryman

What should you know about the Army MOS 11C? Let me start by telling you that this is known as an Indirect Fire Infantryman, sometimes referred to as a morterman.  What I want to do in the rest of today’s post is talk about the duties, responsibilities, job description, the pre-requisites, basic training and AIT, and career opportunities in the MOS.

As a quick disclaimer, I have never served as an 11C myself.  All of this information was collected from independent research I did online and by interviewing Soldiers who previously served in this MOS.

Duties, Responsibilities and Job Description

Here is a short list of duties and responsibilities that 11C Soldiers have.  This is by no means a comprehensive list.

  • Set up, load and fire the 60mm, 81mm or 120mm mortar
  • Employ crew and weapons in offensive, defensive and retrograde ground combat
  • Operate, clean and store automatic weapons
  • Employ, fire and recover antipersonnel and antitank mines
  • Locate and neutralize mines
  • Carry out scout missions to spot enemy troops and gun locations
  • Operate two-way radios and signal equipment to relay battle orders
  • Inspect and perform operator level maintenance on equipment

Pre-requisites for 11C MOS 

The 11C MOS has some unique requirements that most MOS’s don’t have.  First off, it is closed to women.  In addition, recruits must have correctable 20/20 vision in one eye and 20/100 in the other eye.  They must be able to visually identify between green and red (not color blind).

Furthermore, all recruits interested in this MOS enlist as an 11X first, and then pick either 11B (infantry) or 11C (indirect fire) upon completion of basic training (based on Soldier choice and/or the needs of the Army).

The physical demanding rating for this MOS is very heavy.  Soldiers must have the ability to carry heavy mortars and lift heavy equipment.  Next, Soldiers must have a physical profile of 111221 or better.  Finally, recruits must score a 90 or higher on the AR+AS+MC portion of the ASVAB test.

Basic Training and AIT

Soldiers who pick this MOS will attend basic training at Fort Benning, Georgia, the home of the infantry.  After completing basic training you will attend your AIT (Advanced Individual Training) at the same duty station, where you will learn about:

  • Map reading
  • Setting up mortars
  • The call for fire
  • Trajectories
  • The different types of mortars and rounds
  • Inspect and maintain equipment
  • Identify targets
  • And much more!

After graduating from AIT, you will go to your first duty assignment, normally an infantry company or infantry battalion.

Career Opportunities as an 11C

As an 11C, there are plenty of career opportunities both inside and outside of the military.  If you stay enlisted, you can eventually serve in leadership positions such as Team Leader, Squad Leader, Platoon Sergeant, First Sergeant or Command Sergeant Major.  You could also serve as an instructor, recruiter, drill sergeant, career counselor, staff NCO, or a variety of other positions.  There are also opportunities to attend OCS and become a commissioned officer.

After your time in the military is up, you could get a job as a weapons specialist.  You could work for a variety of different government agencies.  You could be a gun smith, instructor, consultant or a wide variety of other jobs.

Final Thoughts

The bottom line is that the 11C MOS is a great MOS for the right individual.  If you want a MOS that is physically demanding, mentally tough, and has a crucial role on the battlefield, this might just be the perfect MOS for you.

On a side note, I would love to hear from you.  If you have any experience as an 11C, please leave a comment below to share your story.  Tell us what you liked about the MOS, what you disliked, what a typically day was like and any tips or wisdom you can share with recruits considering this MOS.   Thanks.

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1 thought on “Army 11C MOS: The Indirect Fire Infantryman”

  1. It’s interesting that, with the exception of the 28th Infantry Division (which dates back much further), all of these divisions can trace their history back to World War I – almost 100 years ago. Foot soldiers have arguably been the backbone of the U.S. Army since the very beginning. One question, though – who decided to label anything out of Washington the “Sunshine Division”?

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